Reformation Resources and Interview

The preservation of the gospel of Christ is always worth celebrating, now as in any era. In 1517, one such notable defense was carried out by Martin Luther as he strove to return the church to purity of faith in the midst of growing corruption. His challenge to draw the church from the interference of merely human influences and back to a life founded upon the Word of God was issued in the form of ninety‐five theses. In honor of the 31st of October’s Reformation Day (a day meant to celebrate the preservation of the glorious gospel of our salvation), we present Luther’s Ninety‐Five Theses. In addition, here is an mp3 audio message on Reformation Day, by Pastor Kevin Otsuji of Reverence Bible Church.

We also ask: Is Reformation theology still relevant today?

We certainly think so. We contacted Christian apologist Thaddeus Williams (Ph.D., Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam; Theology Professor, Biola University) and asked him why Reformation thinking needs to continue today. Here’s what he said:

Is Reformation theology still relevant today? Absolutely! It reminds us that we have a big God and that salvation is found in Him alone. We are saved by grace alone, through faith alone, in Christ alone, for God’s glory alone. And we know this because Scripture alone is our highest standard for truth. We don’t determine what is good and true about God. God does.

I would argue that the biggest problem in the church today is that many of us have too small a view of who God is. We have shrunk an infinite being. We have diminished His glory and put Him into very small and manageable boxes. This ignores the objectively there God altogether to the point that He becomes (to us) just a projection of what we think He is like, what we feel He should be like.

We need a new reformation—a re-reformation. We, as the church in the 21st century, need to recapture a sense of the grandeur of God—how vast and awesome He is. We need a biblical view of His glory. We need a biblical view of His sovereignty. We need a biblical view of what it means to say He’s both transcendently holy and imminently relational. We need a biblical vision of His love, His mercy, His justice, His grace. If we start there, awestruck by the infinite God at the center of our worldview, then many other issues in our church world will sort of self-fix. As true worship is happening, our marriages will get better, our churches will have less scandals, and our joy will be maximized in Jesus Christ.

Allow me to give a few historical examples of this.

Way back in the first century, we find Jesus Christ championing a big view of God. Meanwhile, there are these Pharisees who had shrunk their view of God by essentially saying, “At the end of the day, our rule-keeping and our mile-long lists of dos and don’ts, that is where we get our righteousness.” Jesus confronts this man-centered view of salvation (which, by the way, is no good news at all). He reminds the Pharisees that they are not the point. The glory of God is!

The same debate breaks out later in the first century. Only this time, you have the apostle Paul on one side and the Judaizers on the other. The Judaizers were a group of Jews who were telling all the Gentiles (non-Jews) that if you want to get saved, you’ve got to supplement God’s grace with circumcision and adherence to all kinds of rituals within the Jewish culture. The apostle Paul boldly rose to the challenge, confronted the Judaizers, and revealed that their message of salvation is a different gospel altogether. After all, if salvation is a man-centered endeavor that comes down to us jumping through religious hoops, then what’s so good about that news? Paul contended for a radically God-centered view of reality.

If we move forward in church history to the 4th century, we find the same scenario. Same question, new century. Pelagius was a monk who said that man had the power in and of himself to choose salvation. Augustine contended against him, claiming that Pelagius had strayed off a biblical course and down the dead-end road of works-based salvation. Augustine fought to bring the popular theology of the day back to the Bible alone—back to a God who does the saving. What’s interesting is that at this point, the fourth century Roman Catholic Church actually sides with Augustine and deems Pelagianism heretical.

In the 16th century, however, the Roman Catholic Church had slid from a God-centered view back into a man-centered view of salvation. Under their teachings, one could buy a plenary indulgence—a little sheet of paper that was basically a sure-shot passport to heaven. One could also visit a number of sacred sites and gaze upon the relics of Saint Peter and others. It was a man-centered movement about trying to reach God by the power of human volition. Then, Martin Luther shows up on the scene standing in the same shoes that Augustine stood in the 4th century, the same shoes that Paul stood in during the 1st century. Luther contended for a biblical view of salvation in which all credit goes to amazing grace of God. Thus, Luther helped start the Protestant Reformation: protesting what had become a man-centered institution.

Now, here we are in the 21st century. A recent survey asked a large number of professing Christians how we get to heaven: Is it by good works or as an act of grace? An alarming 73% of Protestants in mainline denominations said that God let’s us into heaven based on our good works. Many of today’s Protestants have embraced the very anti-gospel doctrine that Protestantism originated to protest! It is the same pattern we’ve seen throughout history. We get pulled downward into our self-powered salvation attempts with an almost gravitational force.

So, this raises the question: Who are the Luthers, the Augustines, the Pauls of the 21st century? In other words, who are the people willing to stand up for the good news that we are saved by grace alone, through faith alone, in Christ alone, for the glory of God alone? Where are the people willing to stand in those shoes?

How desperately we need God at the center! God is salvation’s author. He alone gets the glory. This is reformation thinking, and we will need it always.

(For additional articles on the contemporary need for Reformation visit Dr. Williams website: www.rereform.com)

  • Bob Demyanovich

    Amen

  • Mark (Cov)

    Who are the Luthers, the Augustines, the Pauls of the 21st century?

    They are those of us that have stood to be counted on The Lords side. Those of us that have for example refused to follow the darkness of being politically correct, that stand up for the sanctity of one man and one woman in marriage. Those that regardless of ridicule and pointed hatred continue to proclaim that life is sacred. We still without shame give thanks over a meal in public yet in private lend a helping hand to those in need allowing God to get the glory. That point out the only way to The Father is through His Son Jesus The Messiah. Because though Him the final sacrifice has been made, the eternal bill paid.

    “But you are a chosen people, the King’s cohanim, a holy nation, a people for God to possess! Why? In order for you to declare the praises of the One who called you out of darkness into his wonderful light.” 1 Peter 2:9

    These are the Luthers, the Augustines, the Pauls of the 21st century. They, we simply make darkness uncomfortable even just by walking into the room. Not because of outward appearance or loud proclamations. But because just as the morning pushes away the night, the Light of God in us will displace darkness. You will know them by their love one for another.

    Have a great weekend,
    Mark (Cov)

    • Barbara LeFevre

      Mark~

      I don’t know if you’ve been back to the October 17 blog, but I have responded to your last post.

      Barbara

      • Mark (Cov)

        Barbara, I will take a look at the response this afternoon or early tomorrow.

        Have a good weekend.

        Mark (Cov)

  • http://www.shinar.us Lee Timotheos

    I thought Reformation Day happened when Jesus rose from the dead. I love Martin Luther and God used him, but I think “protestants” (I think that name is silly too) put too much focus on the man. He’s only a human being and I don’t even agree with (or understand) half the stuff he said. Jesus Christ is the Man, no one else.

    But God bless Luther for his stand.